Daisy

One commericial - maybe one man - fundamentally changed how we elect our leaders. Daisy presents the moment in TV history when the age of negative advertising was dropped into our lives. As a nation contemplates war, distracted by the packaging of a seemingly peaceful U.S. president, the Doyle Dane Bernbach advertising agency is immersed in its own crisis. At the nexus of it all sits eccentric sound man and legendary communications guru Tony Schwartz.

Set during the 1964 U.S. presidential election, while brutal race riots erupted across America, a group of Madison Avenue ad men working for President and presidential candidate Lyndon Johnson unleash the most powerful political commercial ever conceived, the "Daisy" ad. War was the objective. Peace was the bait. Everyone got duped.

Winner of Broadway World Seattle Critic's Choice Award for Best New Play (2016)

Nominated for Gregory Award for Outstanding New Play (2016)

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PROJECT HISTORY

Daisy premiered at Seattle's ACT Theatre in July 2016. The play was commissioned by Ensemble Studio Theatre (NYC) through the Sloan Foundation. Daisy was developed by Horseshoes & Hand Grenades Theatre (Ottawa) and ACT Theatre, and received a workshop at the Icicle Creek New Play Festival. Daisy received its second U.S. production at Houston's Main Street Theatre in March 2018. Daisy was featured in American Theatre magazine.  

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PRODUCTION INFO

Cast of 5 men and 1 woman. Interested producers or readers may purchase a copy of Daisy from either Dramatists (U.S.) or Talon Books (Canada). Please note that Dramatists holds the licensing rights, so inquiries about production should be directed there. 

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DAISY LINKS

The script for Daisy makes numerous references  to video and sound elements, as well as political speeches, commercials, newscasts, etc. Links to these sources and other useful reference materials can be found here.

“Daisy” is a story that, through history’s irritating tendency to repeat itself...resonates so deeply with our current moment that it should be required viewing for all registered voters.
— Seattle Weekly